Breads, Biscuits, Crackers, Pancakes, Waffles and Rolls

Basic Waffles

I call this a basic waffle recipe, but have added options and alternatives, adapted from the manual which came with the waffle maker. The version which I get the most compliments from is using the ingredients (if an alternate is given) highlighted in bold/italics! I use a Cuisinart waffle maker and bake each waffle for 3 minutes, until light and fluffy and not hard and crispy. Leftovers can be heated up in a toaster. Everyone’s favourite topping is good old Quebec Maple Syrup!

Boat Pancakes

Made using Bisquick mix. Can be made up in a large ketchup bottle and squirted onto the griddle!

Boat Tea Biscuits

Another Bisquick mix recipe. Always handy to have a box or two on the boat.

Carol’s Brown Bread

I have many fond memories of Saturday evening suppers at the Hall residence, eating Carol’s baked beans and her amazing brown bread.  I loved that brown bread and although I rarely made bread as I wasn’t that good at it, I did ask her for this recipe!  I have since adapted it for my bread maker. Carol passed away a few years ago and I will always remember her as a traditional mother, cook and wife. Carol ruled the roost!

Heather’s Newfoundland Cheese Biscuits and McLaren’s Cheese Coins

When working at the hospital, one day the Pharmacy department had a bake sale for a fund raiser. I bought these delightful little biscuits and asked who made them and then asked Heather for the recipe. She said they were commonly made in Newfoundland. December, 2015 I found the recipe on the Kraft website and made it from them. I started with whole wheat flour, then made additional batches with a combination and then with only white flour. As the flour got whiter I cut back on the worcestershire sauce, which originally called for 1 tsp in the recipe. I finally made a batch with no sauce at all and only with white flour. As I remember Heather’s recipe, I think it is my favourite of the two.

Master Baking Mix

I love this baking mix. It is so much fun during the times you are a chronic baker. I don’t remember which book I got it from, but it (or a variation of it) is in every home ec cook book. We have all made it, or at least read the recipe! Store the “mix” in a covered container at room temperature. Can even be tripled. Recipes follow and it is assumed you know some methods in putting things together. Rolling, folding, stirring, mixing, etc. Take a bunch of this mix on the boat. You can even pull it out and roll fresh fish in it as a covering prior to cooking. Add milk to a consistency for a thicker batter for fish. Who would have known from fish batter to chocolate cake!

Tea Biscuit Dough

Another one of my Purity Cook Book staples. I use the dough recipe for more than just biscuits. It makes a great pizza dough, spreading it out on a pizza stone with cornmeal underneath. It is great for a loaf, spreading it out and adding your favourite fish or meat pie ingredients, folding it over and then backing. Anywhere you need a crust or a covering, it can be used.

Peter Gzowski’s Perfect Bread

Peter Gzowski, 1934-2002, was a well known Canadian broadcaster who, if alive today would be referred to as a foodie. I found this recipe in a magazine, I believe, sometime between 1992 and 1997. I was never a great bread maker. Actually, I basically failed at it but somehow managed to pull this recipe off!  This bread (and probably most breads) require three things in the process: Use new yeast (throw out the old stuff), knead the dough for the full 10 minutes  and have the house warm enough for the bread to rise.

Tea Biscuit Dough

Another one of my Purity Cook Book staples. I use the dough recipe for more than just biscuits. It makes a great pizza dough, spreading it out on a pizza stone with cornmeal underneath. It is great for a loaf, spreading it out and adding your favourite fish or meat pie ingredients, folding it over and then backing. Anywhere you need a crust or a covering, it can be used.

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